Lord, am I a fox?

Lord, am I a fox? 
 
This last week I had the chance to preach on Luke 13:31-35. In the passage Jesus is told about how Herod, the vassal king of Jerusalem, wants to kill him. Jesus’ response is straight forward and pointed: he calls Herod a fox. In the context of the first century the idea of being a fox is not a good one. It is not the image of the sweet little reddish creature that we have in mind. In fact Jesus, in essence, calls him a crafty death dealer. 
 
Fox = deceptive, crafty, death dealer
 
What Herod seems to value is the deceptive practice of politics. The idea of slithering up the ladder one rung to another, but not to inspire hope or share the in best of God’s plan for his fellow human beings, but to control and crush those who offer resistance. He would be akin to America’s favorite crafty villain Frank Underwood as played by Kevin Spacey on the House of Cards. This is the kind of character where the ends always justifies the means and in the end he will sell his soul to gain the power wanted. 
 
I do not think that we are Frank Underwood or even Herod, but I think that we might be more accustomed to the underpinnings of their position on power than we would like to admit. We sometimes find ways to enact our will that are little fox like, crafty, and deceitful. We find ways to take credit for the work of other. We find ways to manipulate others around us, and sometimes even those that are there to help us. We never like to admit it, but sometime when the lights are off and our heads hits the pillow at the end of the day, we survey the day and ask why in the world did we choose to live like this?  Why did we choose to be a fox? 
 
Lent offers us the chance to reset!
 
It is the time of year that we come in preparation for Easter. We come in the full knowledge of our brokenness knowing that we are people that face temptation, people that deal in death, people that sometimes turn their cheek, but not in Christlike fashion, but rather to avoid seeing the need of our neighbor. So we come, and we offer to give up things; things that are to call us away from the way of the world’s death dealing, things that are to call us to come and gather under the motherly care of our God’s wings. 
 
So I ask you what are you giving up? 
 
I hope that we, as God’s people, are giving up on being foxes… ]]>


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